Buckwheat crackers with olives and herbs

Buckwheat crackers with olives and herbs

buckwheat crackers olives herbs hummus

Last week, Duncan and myself decided to check out a local organic farm, Kamarantho, in the search of some quality produce. We had a bit of trouble finding the place as it really is off the beaten track, but we were so glad we did.

From the very outset, we were welcomed by super friendly and enthusiastic Elena, who runs the place and is a well of knowledge when it comes to plants and their intricate ways…

She showed us around her greenhouse with an eclectic mix of plants, ranging from several different species of kale to miniature bananas that she got from a fellow farm in Crete. Then we had a tour of the open air garden with some beautiful sun-kissed varieties of tomatoes, zucchinis, eggplants, watermelons and pumpkins.

The rest of the farm is lots and lots of olive trees and an impressive array of herbs dotted here and there. Herbs are harvested by hand and dried in one of two ways. The more fragile ones are dried on a giant drying rack and the more hardy ones go into natural sacks, which are hung in a cute little ‘house’ made up of hay bales that create a perfect environment for drying herbs gently.

It’s these beautiful fragrant herbs and gorgeous Greek olives (which I never get sick of) that have inspired today’s recipe. I started off wanting to make simple, gluten-free olive crackers that would make a perfect accompaniment to hummus (and beetroot hummus in particular). Both dried rosemary and thyme that I got from the farm were ideal (as they go with olives and with beetroot equally well), so they cinched the deal.

My other objective with this recipe was to use up my almond milk pulp, which we often have left over after making almond milk and these crackers offer a straightforward way to get rid of it. No need to dry it out or dehydrate it first, it goes into the mixture as is. It works a treat, making the crackers a little less dense.

I am really happy with how these little snacks have turned out. I’ve been making them with different flours and ground nuts and seeds all week as they are really quite addictive. So if you don’t have almonds to hand, use ground up walnuts or pumpkin seeds instead – both work well. And if you are not as keen on buckwheat flour as I am, a mixture of chickpea and brown rice flour works well too.

buckwheat crackers cutting

buckwheat crackers tray

buckwheat crackers close

makes
25-30
PREP
20 min
COOKING
20 min
makes
25-30
PREPARATION
20 min
COOKING
20 min
INGREDIENTS
  • 100 g / 1 cup buckwheat flour*
  • ½ packed cup almond pulp or ¾ cup finely ground almonds**
  • ¾ tsp fine sea salt (I used smoky Messolonghi salt)
  • 1 garlic clove, very finely grated
  • 10 Kalamata olives, very finely chopped (I used black and green)
  • 1 tsp dry rosemary (crushed in a pestle and mortar)
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 30-45 ml / 2-3 tbsp olive oil
METHOD
  1. Combine buckwheat flour, well wrought-out almond pulp, salt, rosemary, thyme, nutritional yeast, baking powder and grated garlic clove in a large bowl. Mix very well.
  2. Add finely chopped olives. Mix well.
  3. Add olive oil (use 2 tablespoons for a healthier version and 3 for a more indulgent version) and rub it into the dry ingredients with your hands.
  4. Finally add water – be careful, do it very gradually – how much water you’ll need depends on how absorbent your flour is and whether you’ve used almond pulp or dry almond flour. I added just over 1 tbsp. Combine all the ingredients into a dough. It shouldn’t be either too dry or too sticky. If too dry add a touch more water, if too sticky dust with some extra buckwheat flour.
  5. Preheat your oven to 175° C fan forced / 350° F fan forced (or 195° C / 380° F on the regular setting).
  6. Place your dough on a large sheet of baking paper. Spread it with your fingers until fairly flat, then cover with another piece of baking paper and roll into a very thin (2 mm / 0.08″ ) sheet with a rolling pin. Pay attention to the middle as it tends to be thicker than the sides.
  7. Take the top layer of the baking paper off and cut the dough into similar size pieces with a knife or a pizza cutter.
  8. Bake for about 15-22 minutes. The edge pieces are going to be ready sooner (about 15-17 min) while the middle ones will take a little bit longer. I tend to remove the edge ones earlier (they will be very hot, so be careful) and spread the middle ones out a little so that they bake faster. They are done when golden – don’t let them brown too much though as they will become hard. Cool and keep in an airtight container.

NOTES
*If you don’t like / don’t have buckwheat flour, I’ve also made a batch with 50% chickpea and 50% brown rice flour and it also worked well.

**If you have a nut allergy, use ground up (hulled i.e. without the white exterior) pepitas / pumpkin seeds instead.

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NUTRITIONAL INFO
calories
47
2%
sugars
0 g
0%
fats
3 g
5%
saturates
0 g
2%
proteins
1 g
3%
carbs
3 g
1%
*per cracker
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5.0
10 reviews, 26 comments
REVIEWS & QUESTIONS
Elodie:
These sound super delish, I look forward to making them! Could I sub chickpea flour for the almond pulp/ pepitas? Nuts are fine just I don't have almonds on hand but I do have dried chickpeas in the pantry.
    Ania
    Ania:
    Hi Elodie,
    Yes, it will work but the texture will be denser and you may also need to adjust the amount of liquid needed. How about walnuts? I think ground up walnuts would work really well too. Ania
Sabrina:
It was my first time making crackers and it was so easy and simple! These are delicious. I'm taking them on a camping trip this weekend; they're going to be the perfect snack in the car! Thank you Ania.
    Ania
    Ania:
    Thank you, Sabrina! I'm so happy to hear that you enjoyed these and find them easy to make too. Thank you for taking the time to leave this lovely review - I really appreciate it! Happy camping, hope the sun is out for you! x Ania
Karen:
Thank you these are great. I added 1tbs flax seeds, 1 tbs toasted sesame seeds, 1 tbs toasted pumpkin seeds and/or sunflower seeds, and chilli flakes. YUM
    Ania
    Ania:
    Great to hear that you enjoyed these, Karen! And all your additions sound great too. Ania
Nicole:
These look amazing! Can I make them without the olives?
    Ania
    Ania:
    Sure! You could also sub with sun-dried tomatoes, for example. Ania
Andy Leask:
Just made these today - major grain intolerances, essentially only buckwheat and not many nuts either (so I subbed the almond pulp for sunflower and pumpkin seeds). They are delicious, and so easy to make. Thank you!
    Ania
    Ania:
    Yay, I'm delighted to hear that Andy! It's great that you found something that doesn't cause you pain and that you can enjoy. Ania
Katya Braxton:
These crackers are so good!! Easy to make and so very easy to munch on! Making a second batch this weekend for a friends dinner - will add some fresh dill in the batter this time!
    Ania
    Ania:
    Thanks, Katya! I'm really happy to hear that you enjoyed these. And thanks for taking the time to let me know that these were a hit - much appreciated. Ania
Adrienne Foon:
Love this recipe! Thank you! Quick easy and delicious!
    Ania
    Ania:
    Thanks for your kind words, Adrienne. I am delighted to hear that! Ania
Judith:
These are really tasty. I normally don't like the taste of buckwheat flour but this recipe has converted me. I made your beet hummus too. The two make for a really healthy snack.
    Ania
    Ania:
    Thanks so much for your kind words, Judith! I’m delighted to hear that you enjoyed these and that they converted you to buckwheat, which is a very healthy thing to eat. Ania
Roser:
Hello!
I did my first batch and the dough breaks while rolling it. The result is great but wondering if that's normal? :)
Thanks!
    Ania
    Ania:
    Hi Roser,
    Depends what you mean. If it's simply cracking a little, here and there, as you roll that's okay as buckwheat has no gluten so it will never have the elasticity that wheat flour does. If it is however impossible to roll it out and cut into shapes (like in my photo), you need to add a touch more liquid - your dough is too dry. Hope that helps! Ania
Inge:
They are delicious!! And such an economic way of using the almond pulp. We're a fan of this recipe and of your blog. Every recipe I try is a succes!
    Ania
    Ania:
    Delighted to hear that, Inge! Thanks so much! x Ania
MaryEllen:
Thank you for the creative recipe. I have been looking for healthy tasty GF cracker recipes. Love that this uses almond pulp as well. Hate throwing this out but haven’t found many good uses. They are delicious but did take longer to bake for me. Closer to 30 minutes
    Ania
    Ania:
    I'm so pleased to hear that you like them, Mary Ellen. As for the time in the oven, a lot depends on your oven and how thinly these have been rolled out and how big the pieces are.
cho:
hi,
can i use substitute the yeast with anything else?
    Ania
    Ania:
    There is nothing really like it but you can skip if you don't have any. Hope that helps! Ania
Dee:
Is almond pulp the same as almond butter?
    Ania
    Ania:
    Hi,
    No, almond pulp is the dry matter left after making almond milk. Hope that helps! Ania
Solaris:
is it possible to skip the nutritional yeast in this recipe? My doctor recommended that I avoid any yeast or yeast products.
    Ania
    Ania:
    Yes, of course, they are simply added for slightly a 'cheesy' flavour. Anna
Sue:
Have had so many great comments when I’ve made these. They are so delicious but don’t last long ! Very moorish thank you .
    Ania
    Ania:
    So glad to hear that, Sue! Thank you for taking the time to review and rate this recipe - it means a lot! Ania
Sol:
Delish!. This recipe is really great. The only problem is that I need to made them every 3 days because my husband and I are eating them all. In five minutes I will start my baking them.
Thanks!
    Ania
    Ania:
    That's so lovely to hear, Sol! :) Your kind comment made me smile, thank you! Ania
Moni:
I’ve just made a double batch for a Tuesday birthday morning tea at work and they are SO good that I’ll have to put them out of my sight for the next 36 hours! And tomorrow am is a turn of eggless banana bread (for the same occasion). I’m really curious how delectable it’s gonna be. Happy Sunday from Down Under, Moni
    Ania
    Ania:
    Ha ha, thanks so much for your kind words, Moni. Your comment made me laugh out like cos it reminds me of me not being able to leave a jar of cookies / crackers or a tin of brownies alone so I always strive to give it away as soon as I make it. Hope you'll enjoy my banana bread also! Ania
Chris Lazarus:
What does "fan forced" mean for over temp?
    Ania
    Ania:
    Hi Chris,
    Fan-forced is an oven setting whereby the hot air is circulated, resulting in a faster cooking time, as well as browning more quickly. If you don't have that setting, up the temperature by 20°C to achieve similar result. Hope that helps! Ania
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